9 Best Tennis Rackets for Beginners 2024

by Timo GD

Equipment Tennis Racquets

You face the difficult task of choosing a tennis racket as a beginner in 2024?

The amount of tennis rackets and the claims of manufacturers that every single one of their rackets is the best, of course, do not help in the search.

I have written this guide to help you find the best tennis racket for beginners that is specifically tailored to your needs.

The test winners per category

Allow me to simplify the process of finding a racquet by walking you through each step and sharing my top recommendations and reviews of the best tennis racquets for beginners in 2024. Here are my top recommendations:

Easy to Play

head ti s6

HEAD TI.S6

Power

94

Spin

65

Control

74

Arm Friendly

94

Great for Intermediates

HEAD Boom Team

Power

84

Spin

84

Control

86

Arm Friendly

82

Great for Spin

head extreme team l

HEAD Extreme Team L

Power

86

Spin

100

Control

74

Arm Friendly

70

Great for Power

babolat pure drive 110

Babolat Pure Drive 110

Power

100

Spin

82

Control

84

Arm Friendly

74

Budget

Wilson Tour Slam Lite

Wilson Tour Slam Lite

Power

65

Spin

65

Control

65

Arm Friendly

80

Arm Friendly

wilson clash 100l v2

Wilson Clash 100L v2

Power

84

Spin

82

Control

88

Arm Friendly

100

Independent & Unbiased

All products featured on FourtyLove are tested independently by me. I do not favour any brands nor do I receive any money from brands influencing my results. I might earn a small commission if you buy products through my affiliate links.

36

Rackets Tested

300

Hits per Racket

43

Hours Tested

435.519

Readers

All rackets compared

In this comprehensive guide, I’ve written the first part to educate players on the specific parts of a tennis racket. From what you need to how to find the ideal features of a tennis racket, I’ve got you covered.

 

If you want to get right to the heart of the matter, just click on one of the links to explore each tennis racket on my list and learn the reasons for their inclusion.

Tennis Racket Comparison Table

Racket Power Spin Control Arm Friendly Rating

HEAD TIS6


See Review
94 65 74 94 82

Dunlop SX600


See Review
82 96 88 85 85

HEAD Boom Team


See Review
84 84 86 82 84

HEAD Extreme Team L


See Review
86 100 74 70 83

Yonex EZONE 100L


See Review
88 94 70 70 81

Babolat Pure Aero Team


See Review
82 88 95 70 84

Babolat Pure Drive 110


See Review
100 82 84 74 85

Wilson Clash 100L v2


See Review
84 82 88 100 89

Wilson Tour Slam Lite


See Review
65 65 65 80 69

Does it matter which tennis racket you choose?

Yes, it does but not as much as some people say. After all you are a beginner and the easiest way to improve is to work on your game and no by buying a new racket. Nonetheless if you are looking for a tennis racket as a beginner, there are a few rules that increase the chances of fitting a good racket for you:

 

The most important rule when buying

The most important rule for buying a new tennis racket for beginners is the following: It’s better to outgrow a tennis racket than to grow into it. Start with a tennis racket that feels easy and effortless to play.

As your skills develop, you can look for a new racket.

 

Don’t believe the marketing!

Tennis newbies usually believe that the choice of their racket will determine their success on the court, but this is not the case. While it’s true that there are both good and bad options for beginners, it’s important to understand that the player’s skills have much more influence than the material.

The reality is that buying the tennis racket that a player like Rafael Nadal uses will not improve your tennis. For many beginners, it might even make them worse and in some cases causes harm to their body.

However, blindly ignoring the choice of racket is also a mistake. The most important features of the tennis racket can help make the first stages of tennis easier and more fun. And fun is something you should not undervalue as a beginner as it keeps you in the sport.

Questions you need to ask yourself

Is your budget more than $70 for your tennis racket?

If you’re on a tight budget, don’t worry! Getting into tennis doesn’t necessarily have to tear a hole in your pocket. I’ve packed a very affordable tennis racket into the list. You can always upgrade later as you progress.

However, if you want to invest a little more, you’ll find some tennis rackets in my list of the best tennis rackets for beginners in 2024 that cost more but also offer significantly more perfomance and technologies.

 

Want to improve your game?

If you’re a casual player who only wants to hit the court a few times a year with friends, you don’t necessarily need to invest in a top-of-the-line tennis racket. An affordable option will serve you well.

However, if you’re serious about taking lessons and committing to the game long-term, you’ll soon appreciate the benefits of a mid-range tennis racket as you develop as a player. A quality racquet can complement your playing style and improve your skills, but remember that developing fundamental technique comes first. No tennis racket can do that for you!

 

Know your playing style?

At first, it is not so easy for beginners to clearly define their own game. An advanced tournament player can classify his own and his opponents’ game and make a clear decision for or against specific types of tennis rackets based on this knowledge.

As a beginner, of course, this is not so easy, since your own game has not yet developed in a clear direction. You know how you play? A lot of topspin? Little topspin? Fast? Slow? Great! If not, you should choose a tennis racket from the “Allround” category.

3 types of tennis rackets

Very roughly speaking, there are 3 different categories that you can put any tennis racket into. There are of course many more subcategories and additional features that make up a racket, but to save some time here are the 3 most important main categories:

Power Tennis Rackets

As you’ve probably guessed, “power racquets” help you put more speed and length into your balls without requiring more effort. These tennis racquets are often recommended to beginners, or players who are not technically advanced.

Additionally, these tennis racquets are an excellent choice for small or young men and women who simply don’t have enough strength to generate the power they need. The characteristics of these tennis rackets include: oversized racket head, very long -stiff frame, light overall weight.

Tennis rackets for control

These rackets are for advanced beginners with an acceptable technique and do not need a tennis racket that brings additional power. This mostly includes tennis rackets with a smaller racket head and frame.

 

Tweener tennis racket

The tweener racket takes its name from “in-between” and therefore offers an excellent alternative, which can be classified in the characteristics exactly between a control and power racket.

Features of a tennis racket for beginners

They are divided into the categories of spin, control, power, all-round and arm-friendly.
Of course, a tennis racket for beginners does not have “For beginners!” printed on it. So how can tennis rackets for players who don’t just started be defined? Quite simply by the technical details, which you can usually find printed on the frame or, of course, on the Internet.

You should definitely check out my article “What is a tennis racket made of” to understand the influence the different parts have on the racket and your game.

 

Weight

Weight is very crucial in choosing your tennis racket, as it has the biggest impact on your swing. As a beginner, you should make sure to choose a tennis racket that is easy to maneuver and that you can hold comfortably for long periods of time, so it definitely shouldn’t be too heavy.

where to find the racket weight on the frame
The weight of the tennis racket is printed on the frame.

An ideal tennis racket for beginners should not be heavier than 10oz. Depending on whether you’re looking for a new racket for a full-grown man or a 14-year-old girl, the weight varies by an ounce.

Weight-of-Tennis-Rackets-for-all-Levels

Grip Size

When you buy an adult tennis racket, you have the option to choose a grip size based on the circumference of the handle. Choosing the right grip size is important to prevent injury and ensure comfort.

To find the right grip size, measure your hand with a ruler from the tip of your ring finger to the bottom crease that starts between your index finger and thumb. Using this measurement and the chart below, find your grip size.

Hand Measurement (inches) Hand Measurement (mm) in Inches Grip Size
4.0 102mm 4 L0
4.0 – 4.125 102 – 105mm 4 1/8 L1
4.125 – 4.25 105 – 108mm 4 2/8 L2
4.25 – 4.375 108 – 111mm 4 3/8 L3
4.375 – 4.5 111 – 114mm 4 4/8 L4
4.5 114mm 4 5/8+ L5

 

To find the best fit, you should go to a store that sells tennis rackets and try different grip sizes to find the one that is most comfortable for you.
Small tip: if you are not sure whether to choose grip size 3 (4 3/8) or grip size 4, go for the small grip size. You can easily increase the grip strength with one more grip tape.

 

Tennis Racket head size

This measurement in square inches or centimeters refers to the size of the area where the strings are located.

A larger racket head size offers two advantages:

  1. First, it’s easier to hit the ball or you have more room for error in your swing because the stringbed is larger. On the other hand, a smaller head size can lead to more misses or balls that hit the frame.
  2. Second, a larger head size usually provides more power, which is helpful for inexperienced players who lack the physical strength necessary to apply that power themselves.

Typically, tennis racket head sizes range from 93 to 107 square inches.

wo man die schlägerkopfgröße auf einem tennisschläger erkennt

The racket head size determines the size of the sweet spot which is the area we ideally want to hit when swining a tennis racket. Therefore, a larger racket head of at least 645 cm2 (100 sq in) makes sense for beginners.

tennis-racket-head-size-for-all-playing-levels

String Pattern

Preferably, you should choose an open string pattern of 16×19 or 16×18. Unlike tighter string patterns like 18×20, they make it easier for you to get good length and more spin in your strokes.

string-pattern-and-its-effect-on-spin-and-control

Additional Factors

Additional factors that play a minor role:

  • Frame Thickness:The frame should be thicker than 27mm so you can get enough power into the ball even at lower racket head speeds.
  • Swing Weight: influences how heavy a tennis racket feels when swinging. A higher swingweight means more power and stability, but less maneuverability. A lower swingweight means less power and stability, but more maneuverability.
  • Frame Stiffness (RA): measures how stiff frame is. A higher RA value indicates a stiffer frame, which usually means more power and less control.
  • String: influences every characteristic of the racquet and can be chosen supportively for strengths or weaknesses.
  • Balance: influences maneuverability. A top-heavy balance point provides more power, while a grip-heavy balance point provides more control.

 

Specs of a tennis racket for beginners:

  • Weight: lighter than 10 ounces
  • Rack head size: larger or equal to 100sq in
  • Length: longer than 27 inches
  • String pattern: open patterns like 16×19 or 16×18
  • Frame thickness: thicker than 27mm
  • String: Not poly, but multifilament
  • Balance: whatever you like

The big and famous tennis racket brands

As a newcomer to the tennis world, you’ll encounter several racket brands. The “Big-Four” consist of:

  • Head
  • Babolat
  • Wilson
  • Yonex

Each of these brands has its own unique design and technology. You’ll find a range of different tennis racquets to suit your needs with these brands, as well as all the others.

Tennis Rackets for Men and Women

Are there differences between tennis rackets for men and women? Almost all tennis rackets on the market today are unisex.

Only the Tecnifibre T-Rebound Iga targets women with its marketing, but many other tennis rackets meet the same characteristics that are important for a racket for women without being specifically marked for women.

Weight is the most important criterion for players. Lighter versions of just about every known tennis racket model are now available for both men and women. These are usually marked “Team”, “Light” or simply “L”.

head-boom-team-close-up
The “team” on the frame stands for a lighter version of the tennis racket

Tennis rackets for beginners or advanced?

What is the difference between tennis rackets for beginners and tennis rackets for advanced players? There is no exact separation between the two. Technology and the consequent cost are the 2 factors that most often differentiate them.

  1. Technology
    A beginner tennis racket is usually not made of advanced materials and does not bring the latest technologies as advanced tennis rackets often have.
  2. Cost
    Due to the materials and lack of technologies, beginner tennis rackets usually cost less than $150 while the top frames always cost north of 200$.

However, the boundaries are fluid. There are so incredibly many different variants of tennis racket models, that often tennis rackets for advanced players are an excellent choice for beginners. The weight is usually what makes an advanced racket too hard to swing for a beginner.

Strings Explained Quickly

Get ready to perfect your string game! It’s time to talk about tennis strings, the often overlooked helper of your trusty racquet. You may think that strings are just a bunch of strings, but you’re dead wrong!

As a beginner, you may not even notice the difference between different strings, but trust me, they matter. And as you progress and improve your skills, you’ll notice the effects of your string choice on every stroke.

So let’s take a look at the different types of tennis strings and what you should consider when buying your next string. Whether you’re looking for more power, control, or comfort, there’s a string for you. The only thing left to do yourself is string your racket with the string… or have it strung. 😂

String Materials
What are tennis strings made of? Here are the three most important materials:

  • Natural gut
    Made from animal gut and offers excellent playability, but is also the most expensive.
  • Polyester
    Known for durability and is the most popular and commonly sold type of string.
  • Nylon
    Also called polyamide string or synthetic gut, offers an inexpensive but not quite as powerful alternative to natural gut.

String manufacturing

You now know what materials make up a string, but how is it made? There are different techniques to give strings different properties:

  • Monofilament
    “Simplicity is key” – that’s the motto for monofilament strings! They are made of only one fiber (usually polyester). They last a very long time and break extremely rarely.
    The strings slip very little and due to the special coating, which provides additional spin-friendliness, there are bonus points for players who master topspin.
    But beware: compared to multifilament strings, they tend to transmit more vibrations and could lead to arm problems.
  • Multifilament
    The hi-tech manufacturing of the strings, multifilament! Multifilament strings are a tangled web of over 1,000 individual fibers (Spiderman would be jealous).
    These whole fibers provide excellent, long-lasting elasticity, resulting in maximum shock absorption (no more arm pain!) and great playing comfort.
    The only drawback? These strings break relatively quickly for players with fast strokes and you’ll have to stop by more often with your tennis racket for a stringer.

String thickness / String Gauge

Finally, let’s talk about the string thickness which is also called “Gauge”. As you may have guessed, thicker strings are generally more durable and less likely to break, while thinner strings offer more spin potential and a better feel.

So choosing the right string gauge is a balancing act between durability and performance, but don’t worry, I’ve put together a handy chart of the different gauges available for you.

Gauges Millimetres
13 1.65 – 1.80mm
14 1.50 – 1.65mm
15 1.41 – 1.49mm
15L 1.33 – 1.41mm
16 1.26 – 1.34mm
16L 1.22 – 1.30mm
17 1.16 – 1.24mm
18 1.06 – 1.16mm
19 0.90 – 1.06mm
20 0.80 – 0.90mm
21 0.70 – 0.80mm
22 0.60 – 0.70mm

Recommended string for beginners

For beginners, I recommend paying attention to two things when choosing strings for your new tennis racket: price and durability.

As a beginner, it’s difficult to tell the difference between one set of tennis strings and another, so spending too much money on them is pointless.

Also, it’s impractical to change strings frequently, because as a beginner you won’t feel much difference between a string played for two hours and one played for nine hours.

Therefore, it is a wise decision to go for a durable and sturdy string that will save you some money.

In my review of the best strings, I recommend the Prince Synthetic Gut Duraflex for beginners. Super good value for money and great durability. You can’t go wrong with this.

Restringing Tennis Rackets

Should I get my new tennis racket restrung? Here are three scenarios:

    1. No string.
      There is no string on the tennis racket you just purchased? Yes, you should look into getting a string for your racket! 😂
    2. Tennis racket is strung (factory string)
      If a string is already strung on your racket, you should ask at a specialty store or online, or read up on whether it is a string strung by the manufacturer (HEAD, Babolat, etc.). These so-called “factory strings” are usually strung directly after the racket is manufactured. So this stringing has been waiting for months to be used. After such a long time, the string has lost a large part of its stringing hardness and there is only one thing left for you to do: Get the racket restrung.
    3. Tennis racket is strung (new string).
      If it turns out that the factory string has already been renewed by the dealer, you can start directly. However, do not forget to ask once with which hardness was strung. If you get along great with the stringing, you can order the next stringing directly in the same way.

Which stringing tension should I choose?

As a beginner, you shouldn’t worry too much about stringing hardness, as expensive strings won’t have much of an impact on your playing.

Look for the stringing hardness recommended by the manufacturer. Usually this is on the frame and gives a range. Decide on the middle of the range (usually 48-55 lbs).

Soft-strung strings provide more power and a bigger sweet spot (yes really, the sweet spot gets bigger), making them better for avoiding injuries like tennis elbow. Harder strung strings, on the other hand, provide more control but a smaller sweet spot and less “touch”.

How often should I restring my tennis racket?

The answer to this question is answered worldwide with the same rule of thumb:
“As many times as you play in a week, you should restring your racket per year.” I would strongly recommend here that you restring your racket once more often. This is also the number of times you should at least string your tennis racket.

Tennis / week Restring / year Period
1 2 Every 6 months
2 3 Every 4 months
3 4 Every 3 months
4 5 Every 7 weeks
5 6 Every 6 weeks
6 7 Every 5 weeks
7 8 Every 4 weeks

 

What does restringing a tennis racket cost?

To string an adult racket, you need 40 feet of string. Strings are therefore always sold in 23 feet packs, or in a bigger reel of 660 feet. If you buy a reel, you will of course save a lot, because the price per foot is lower. Once you have tested two or three strings, it might be worth buying a reel.

A 40 feet string for beginners should cost around 10$. In addition, there is the cost of the stringerr, which is about 15$. Often this service is free if you buy a string in your local tennis shop. (customer loyalty).

The 9 Best Tennis Rackets for Beginners 2024

With this knowledge, you should now be able to make an informed decision and are well on your way to finding the perfect tennis racket for you.

There are an insane amount of rackets that are designed for beginners. To make your search easier, I’ve put together a list of my 9 favorite racquets for beginners.

Legendary Comfort Racket

HEAD Ti.S6

There’s a good chance you’ve seen the HEAD Ti.S6 on a tennis court before. This iconic racket is an absolute heavyweight… er, lightweight among tennis rackets, and HEAD’s best seller for 25 years for good reason.

It weighs just 225 grams, with string and damper just 9 ounces, and comes with a gigantic sweetspot thanks to the 115 square inch racket head.

This super lightweight design and a ton of power make this racket perfect for beginners who don’t necessarily hit every ball dead center.

But also for players who want to make the sport a little easier again, due to injuries or age, should give the Ti.S6 a chance.

The relatively high swing weight combined with the lightweight titanium frame makes it perfect for players with a short backswing. If you have a very long swing motion and generate a lot of speed, I would tend to advise against the Ti.S6.

If you are looking for a light and forgiving racket and want to make the sport easy for yourself, the Ti.S6 is worth every penny.

PRO

  • Works well with short swings
  • Does not require exact hits in the sweet spot
  • Very comfortable to play volleys

CON

  • Balls sail very quickly into the out if you swing harder with less spin

Our Rating

Allrounder with Spin

Dunlop SX600

The, in my opinion, best and lightest racket with a racket head size of 677 cm2.

The SX600 belongs to the latest Spin series from Dunlop. You can tell by the yellow color, as all racket brands seem to have agreed that Spin rackets are yellow.

It is packed with new technologies, such as the “Spin Grommets” for more spin, the “Spin Boost Stringtech” for a 10% further string pattern to generate even more spin, the “V-Energy Shaft” for an aerodynamic frame and finally the “Sonic Core” from BASF, which according to Dunlop reduces vibrations by up to 37% compared to frames from competitors..

Of these technologies you can think what you want, but the important thing is that Dunlop has really released one of the best rackets for the entry level. 

PRO

  • Very flexible and arm friendly frame
  • Generates a lot of spin
  • A bit longer for more stability (always good :P)
  • Good for short to normal swing lengths

CON

  • none

Our Rating

No-brainer for advanced beginners

HEAD Boom Team

HEAD Boom Team

The HEAD Boom Team is from HEAD’s newest and most visually appealing series. It is intended for ambitious beginners who are confident in a slightly heavier (9.7 oz) and smaller racket head (660 sq in) than is the case with the SX600, for example. 

All rackets from the Head Boom series are intended as an easily accessible racket for all types of players. The Boom Team is one of the best rackets for “better” beginners whose technique already works cleanly.
The special head shape and daruch enlarged racket head, as well as the medium weight make the Boom Team a racket that is easy to play but also allows enough spin and control for better players. Balls hit too hard won’t just be catapulted into the fence like extreme comfort rackets do..

Because of its non-existent weaknesses and the different types of players the Boom Team appeals to, it’s the no-brainer of the best tennis racquets for beginners in 2024, as you’ll almost never go wrong with it.

If you already know what kind of tennis you want to play and have decided to play extremely spin-heavy tennis, for example, the Boom Team is also a good choice, but rackets specifically designed for spin, such as the HEAD Extreme Team L or Yonex Ezone 100 L, may be even better for you.

PRO

  • Supports any style of play
  • Easy to play due to large sweet spot and medium weight
  • Very beautiful and different color

CON

  • none

Our Rating

Maximum Spin for Beginners

HEAD Extreme Team L

HEAD Extreme Team L

HEAD has managed to mimic Babolat’s Pure Aero so well that for beginners who want plenty of topspin support, I don’t even recommend the original, but the excellent “copy.”

The latest version of the Extreme Team L was installed with “Auxetic”. Rackets with this material have a very special and crisp feel when hit, especially for players who have never hit HEAD rackets with Graphene or Auxetic. Hard to describe… you have to experience it for yourself. Some like it, some don’t. 😛

The spin grommets are particularly impressive, providing more string movement and an incredible trampoline effect. This gives the racket its name and gives your balls “extreme” spin. The 105 square inch should keep the frame hits for topspin shots… in check. Badum tsss.

Also, the fresh and new design of the Extreme Team L is a real eye-catcher and makes me a little envious with my predecessor in bright yellow..

The Extreme series has a great long-term advantage for ambitious beginners. If the 9.3 ounces of the Team L version becomes too light for you, you can simply upgrade to the Team with 4 additional ounces. And in case you get so “good” and trust yourself with a tournament frame, but don’t want to learn new racket characteristics, go one step further to the Extreme MP L with a weight of 10.1 ounces.

PRO

  • Generates extreme amounts of spin
  • Many variants with more weight available
  • HEAD finally killed the neon yellow color!

CON

  • Difficult to control without spin

Our Rating

Lots of Spin with Power

Yonex Ezone 100L

Yonex Ezone 100L

The Yonex Ezone 100L is for players who wanted more power from the Extreme. 
The Japanese generates 10% less topspin than the Extreme, however, the Ezone series makes it much easier to play the ball deep into the opponent’s court and the spin is still significantly higher than almost all other racquets.

This racket seemed much harder to play in the test than its direct competitor, the Extreme. After a while, though, you quickly realize how the extra power and depth works, and that the Ezone is a racket for baseline players who want to dictate long rallies. 

The Ezone is definitely not for the rank beginner, but rather for the intermediate player looking for an alternative to the classic spin rackets HEAD Extreme and Babolat Pure Aero. 
If you can handle the mix of power and spin, the Ezone 100L is one of the best rackets for advanced beginners 2024.

PRO

  • Lots of Spin with Power

CON

  • more difficult to play compared to other beginner rackets

Our Rating

Lots of Spin and Control

Babolat Pure Aero Team

Babolat Pure Aero Team

The Pure Aero Team with the spirit of Rafa and Alcaraz in the frame is the ideal racket for beginners who want a lot of topspin but also a lot, a lot of control. 
For beginners with a clean technique, the Pure Aero Team is a great choice. It allows you to play boldly yet consistently so you don’t give your opponent easy points.

If you’re looking for a racquet for spin, the Pure Aero Team should definitely be on your test racquet list.

You haven’t played a Babolat yet? Then you might want to choose a different racket, since Babolats play so uniquely that switching is usually difficult (but not impossible). In all other respects, the Pure Aero Team is virtually identical to the HEAD Extreme Team, only offers a little bit more control.

PRO

  • Lots of Spin and Control

CON

  • none

Our Rating

Maximum Power for Beginners

Babolat Pure Drive 110

Babolat Pure Drive 110

Some players want a little more speed and the ability to play the ball more easily deep into the opponent’s court. For this case, Babolat developed what they call the “definition of power”. The Pure Drive!

One of these power rackets is so well known that you’ve almost certainly seen it before. The Pure Drive from Babolat from 1994 to 2006 the best seller and was only replaced by the Pure Aero specially designed for Rafa as such.

The Pure Drive 110 is very light (9 oz) and top-heavy with a large 110 sq in head. This makes the blue rocket very easy to play and has been impressing with extreme power for years.

If you trust yourself with a small racket head with a few points less power, I recommend the Pure Drive 107.

PRO

  • Great for easy power
  • Easy to play

CON

  • 110 may have too little control -> try Pure Drive 107 if you need more control

Our Rating

Arm Friendly Allrounder

Wilson Clash 100L v2

Wilson Clash 100L v2

The second version of the best-selling tennis racket the last two years, the Wilson Clash, is rightly once again very highly praised by all magazines. The Clash 100L v2 is the highest quality, but also the most expensive racket for beginners that I recommend.

The Clash’s FORTYFIVE° carbon construction and flexibility make it an arm-friendly and stable option for players who prefer comfort and easy-swinging power. The newly revised design at the frame tip creates a larger sweet spot that increases the margin for error and boosts confidence on crucial shots.

If you struggle with arm issues, such as tennis elbow, but still want to play an athletic racket that allows for enough control and spin, the Wilson Clash 100L v2 is the best choice.
Quite important nowadays, many components of the Clash, such as the grommets and the protective tape around the frame are made of environmentally friendly Agiplast from plant basi , to reduce the environmental impact.

If you are a beginner looking for a racket that offers comfort and performance to take your game to the next level, the Clash 100L v2 is for you. As a beginner who is still very much honing his technique, you’re better off testing other racquets.

PRO

  • Eco-friendly production
  • Very arm friendly
  • High quality design

CON

  • For players with an already developed technique
  • Very expensive

Our Rating

Arm Friendly Allrounder

Wilson Tour Slam Lite

Wilson Tour Slam Lite

Wilson’s best seller since the 90’s, with a very large 113 square inch racket head, is the absolute best cheap tennis racket for beginners.
The Wilson Tour Slam Lite is very light (9.7 ounces) and is equipped with an oversized racket head. The frame provides enough power, control and spin for most beginners for the first time.

Despite the low price, Wilson has equipped it with some technologies. Thanks to the Stop Shock Pads, located near the neck of the racket, the vibrations of the hit are well absorbed. With the addition of Volcanic Frame Technology, the racket gives your balls even more power and stability.

If you have only recently dipped into the tennis world or just want to have a sniff without directly spending hundreds of euros on a racket and you just want to get started and play right away, the Tour Slam Lite from Wilson is your racket.

If you consider yourself a “good” beginner, or think that you will make big leaps in your playing strength in the first few months or even weeks, then you should, however, keep your hands off the Tour Slam Lite, as it is really only intended for beginners at the very first beginner level.

PRO

  • Very good price
  • Good value for money
  • Good racket to get into tennis without spending much

CON

  • Not suitable for ambitious beginners who want to play a lot

Our Rating

How to choose the right racket

So you’ve read all the previous sections and you’re still wondering where to start your bat search? Don’t worry my friend, here’s a quick checklist to help you narrow down your choices:

  • Do you have a favorite brand?
  • How heavy do you want your racket to be?
  • Do you need a racket that is especially comfortable?
  • What size racket head do you prefer?

If you take these factors into account, you can already drastically reduce the amount of availabe tennis rackets on the market. For example, if you’re a die-hard HEAD fan, you can focus on the HEAD racquets on this list.

But wait, there are more! Don’t forget to consider your budget and level before making a final decision.

If you’re still not sure which tennis racket to choose, go to your local tennis club or pro store and try out some tennis rackets on the court.

Also, check out online retailers’ demo programs and try out a few racquets (usually for next to nothing). Maybe you’ll find your perfect tennisracket to get you started in your new favorite sport!

Which brand is the best for tennis rackets?

There is no “best” brand of tennis racket, as different players have different preferences depending on their playing style, skill level and personal preferences. Some of the most popular brands in the tennis racket market include Babolat, Wilson, Head, Prince, Yonex and Tecnifibre. These brands have a reputation for producing high-quality rackets that are used by many professional and amateur players around the world.
Which is the best brand for a tennis racket depends on several factors, such as the player’s experience, preferred playing style, and budget. It is important for players to try out different rackets and find one that feels comfortable and meets their needs. It is also worth considering factors such as weight, balance, string tension and head size when choosing a tennis racket.

What is the price range for a good beginner tennis racket?

This price range can vary greatly. The most expensive racket for beginners that I tested costs 250$ (Wilson Clash 100L v2). The cheapest is 35$ (Wilson Tour Slam Lite).
So the range for good tennis rackets for beginners is 35$ – 250$.

What factors are important when choosing a beginner tennis racket?

The weight, racquet head size, and grip size have the most impact on whether beginners feel comfortable with a tennis racquet.

Should beginners choose a lighter or heavier tennis racket?

Beginners should buy a rather light racket between 9 – 10 ounces. Of course, this may vary somewhat depending on gender age and physique.

Timo GD

32 years old and has been playing tennis since the age of 9. Formerly ranked top 400 in the country and would have surely become ATP #1 if it hadn’t been for something else.

More about Timo

Timo GD

  • Racket
    HEAD Extreme Tour (2022)
  • Strings
    IsoSpeed Baseline Control
  • Dampener
    none, useless.
  • Tennis Shoes
    Nike Zoom Cage 4
  • Racket Bag
    HEAD Gravity Duffle Bag
  • Tennis Balls
    Balls Unlimited Code Black
  • What else?
    Blackroll, headphones and a banana. Absolute must haves.

You might also like

9 Best Tennis Rackets 2024

9 Best Tennis Rackets 2024

HEAD Boom 2024 [REVIEW]

HEAD Boom 2024 [REVIEW]

Comments

Leave a comment